About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
SFGTV2 10
CNNW 9
CSPAN 7
MSNBCW 7
CSPAN2 5
FBC 5
KQED (PBS) 2
CNN 1
KTVU (FOX) 1
MSNBC 1
LANGUAGE
English 61
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 61 (some duplicates have been removed)
germany. one of the images germany has natural boundaries to the north and south with the alps and further burden the east and the west is flat plains, so germany had a war over the century with germany or france or that area and poland and because germany was a continental power sandwiched between the maritime europe on one hand and the heartland towards the other it was always problematic which we it would go and how it would develop. i can across this book by accident in early 1989. the berlin fall with -- berlin wall would fall but november. it had occurred to me after reading this book and other books that the berlin wall or the dividing line between eastern and western germany was one. creation of german history that would reinvested soften different territory always in the future so today we have a united germany that trades immensely with poland and has had a wretch most wall -- to approach what and where the european union and the nato or meant to keep russia out and the germans down now they are triumphant economically. germany may not have the solution to every economic problem
and the support groups and we proceeded to attack across into germany. >> there's much more to the story. next, the images he will never be able to forget. >>> 71 years ago following the bombing of pearl harbor, the u.s. entered world war ii. they then moveded into germany and witnessed firsthand horrors of the haolocaust. you're about to see stark images of the war, sights that waitzman say still live with him to this very day. >> our first contact is what we call the holocaust. there was a city of dinslaken. we were greeted with thousands of dead bodies. it was conveyed to us later that the germans poured gasoline on people and burn them alive. we went to nordhausen. we went to this camp. after neutralizing their fire and lowering down the gates, we were again greeted by thousands of dead bodies. we came to a crematorium area. there were 10 or 12 ovens in that camp. most of them the doors were very hot. we got them open, found bones and ashes. we had no idea what to do for these poor people. we gave them sips of water and to not try to do anything else. the medical detachment got there short
't leave germany until 2:00 p.m. and doesn't get back until the 10:00 p.m. hour. meanwhile -- nobody's said this on television, nobody's mentioned this -- they thought they were going to be attacked in tripoli, the embassy was evacuated in tripoli. yet whether they have the injured people on the tarmac, they are severely injured, they send an airplane over to benghazi and they returned to tripoli -- instead of going to italy or to germany -- then the c-17 has to come -- it makes no sense. it makes absolutely no sense. >> greta: the irony and i have no sympathy for the administration's claiming this is politicized because if they would just simply answer these questions, not drag their feet, maybe we will get it in the next 6 or 7 days, but if they would fill in the blanks, nobody would be suspicious. we get silly answers that don't make sense -- that's the problem. that is created by those who hold the facts. >> that's right! i am not trying to politicize this. we have injured americans! in the worst case ttakes 25 hours to extract them to a facility, an american facility, they're in german
the summer polishing spainer and paella. he spoke italian and air back and encouraged me to study germany, learn italian to communicate in tu knee sha and learn spanish to speak with my patients. i saw the world through his eyes. i remember walking into a restaurant in cairo and the waiter saying something in arabic to chris. he chuckled and translated. when you walk in, the whole room lights up. was that just chris or beauty of the arab language or how perfectly they understood each other? chris incorporated the wonderful values of our parents and shared these with the world. he's always been with me. he was the first to see my stand in the crib. he probably taught me to walk. he set the standards for our family really high and brought wonderful friends into our lives, friends who are like brothers and sisters to us now. chris was my most important mentor. he showed me how. so it is not important who your mother is only, not just important who your father is but very important who your big brother is. we had the best. the world needs a lot more big brothers like chris stevens. >> i am to
times for medical evacuation to a field hospital, getting them to germany to the hospital at lamb stool and bringing them on to the united states as soon as they have stabilized has led to .. many of these young men, and they are mostly young men, a few women, but mostly young men, surviving wounds that would have surely killed them in any prior war, even ten or fifteen years ago, and i remember the first time i but at walter reed and i went, met with the first quadruple amputee, he lost both legs and both arms, and all he wanted was to drive a car again. and i saw him again, maybe six months later, with pro they tick arms and legs, prosthetic arms and legs, it is amazing what science and medicine is doing for these young people .. but nobody should estimate, underestimate the magnitude of the rehabilitation challenge and the courage that it takes, day in and day out to try and come back from these terrible wounds and that is where there is not enough we can do for these kids. >> rose: are we over stretched? >> i don't think so. i think we were over stretched at the end of 2006 .. and p
, this is a worldwide phenomenon. germany had to mass murders of high-school. england, 30 years after the most rigid gun laws passed, they have their mosthorrible gun massacre. norway, some of the most strictest gun laws on the planet, and that got on the island and murdered all of their kids. we have to understand somhing new is happening. the guns have always been there. we're working hard to keephem out of the hands of kids, but there is something profoundly new. if we don't focus on that e completely miss the issue here. lou: what is that new -- that change that is overtaking us, our society that can lead to this kind -- >> a new phenomenon. lou: what is it? >> never there before. violence injury, particularly video games. the number one trade law enforcement. man-hours, contact our supply system anywhere you want to measure it. one of the leading trainer is a military. i have a best-selling video series were preparing individual citizens to be able to use deadly force at the moment of truth. and from all those perspectives, we know that simulations and visualization and mental rehearsal is absolut
pressure appears to be mounting on bashar al-asaad as the u.s., germany and th and the netherlands will be sending troops and weapons. >> as part of the absolute unity that we all have on this issue, we have sent an unmistakable message that this would cross a red line. and those responsible would be held to account. >> this comes as president assad may be looking for a way out as this pressure is mounting. we understand he sent an envoy to latin america seeking asylum from countries such as cuba, venezuela or ecuador. his deputy foreign minister denies that claim. syrian rebels are ming closer and closer to damascus. the airport outside of damascus remains to be closed. there are some flights going in and out of there. the international community is no longer flying in and out. we are hearing more and more records of fighting near damascus getting closer to the presidential palace. all this appears to be mounting pressure on the assad regime. anybody predicting the assad regime will fall anytime soon, it's a theory that has been floated for several years and it hasn't come to be.
syria. the ministry made clear the systems are purely defensive. germany and netherlands are supplying the pac three model as soon as their respective parliaments approve the deal which is expected to come soon. >> when that exactly will happen will depend on a number of practical issues that will be sorted out in the very near future. so i can't give you an exact date but i will tell you that the actual deployment of missiles will take place within weeks. >> hundreds of nato troops will also be deployed to install and operate these antimissile weapons but it doesn't appear right now that they will be u.s. troops, shep. >> shepard: sheriffs clinton was at that meeting in brussels. she aimed her words about the syria crisis at another country. >> yes. the secretary directed her comments to russia. she emphasized that the stain legs of these patriot systems in turkey is not meant to destabilize nato's already uneasy relationship with moscow. back here at state chided the russians for skipping upcoming crisis meeting on the syrian conflict. >> we want to see obviously, you know, russia co
only industrial country that came out of second world war intact. europe was on its knees. germany and japan were rubble so we thought that was the natural order of things. it wasn't. and when the other industrial countries recovered we got world competition as we have. we ran into bankruptcies. chrysler now twice. we see that in the southern states where the transplants are without the unions. they weren't the ones who went bankrupt last -- in 2008 and 2009. so it really is a choice. it's a tough choice. and i sympathize with the unions but the fact is that in the global economy where you have to compete on wages and other elements, of the units of production, can you either have, you know, high wages with low employment or you can, as obama would say, spread around the wealth. the fact is that in the right-to-work states, unemployment is 6.9%. >> we have a graphic that shows right-to-work vs. non-right to work statements on employment, go ahead. >> and in the other stays the non-right-to-work it's 8.7. so you can choose to have fewer workers who enjoy higher inflated unnatural, i
, let it snow tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 after that, it's on to germany. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 then tonight, i'm trading 9500 miles away in japan. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 with the new global account from schwab, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i hunt down opportunities around the world tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 as if i'm right there. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i'm in total control because i can trade tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 directly online in 12 markets in their local currencies. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i use their global research to get an edge. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 their equity ratings show me how schwab tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 rates specific foreign stocks tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 based on things like fundamentals, momentum and risk. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i also have access to independent tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 firms like ned davis research tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and economist intelligence unit. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 plus, i can talk to their global specialists 24/7. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and trade in my global account commission-free tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 through march 2013. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 best part... no jet lag. tdd#:
, and the optics industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >> shepard: there is brand new drama in the fiscal cliff standoff. whoops. house republicans are supposed to be voting on part 2 of what they call plan b. they passed part 1 of that earlier but just barely. then they took some kind of recess and as you can see, they haven't come back. mike emanuel is there. is this an oops? >> shep, it's clearly says that they are worried about whether they have the votes. this is the part of plan b that would raise taxes on those making more than a million dollars a year. some republicans say they were not elected to raise taxes on anybody and so they have had experience it been getting pounded by outside conservative groups that have been saying by republican members who say if you v
, but it's not from germany. a powerful, fuel-efficient engine, but it's not from japan. ♪ it's a car like no other... from a place like nother. introducing the all-w 2013hevrolet malibu, our greatest malibu ever. ♪ >>> well, movie producers trying to get their film an oscar nod better kick their pr efforts into high gear. nomination ballot are tuchdu due january 3rd. grae drake is here to make some predictions and so everybody has been talking about "argo" but there could be some sort of surprises, come out of nowhere movies. what's going on? >> this is the time of year where hollywood is all abuzz, and you can sit in a restaurant and hear something whispering about the new movie that's going to get a nomination. i think first and foremost, most of these movies aren't out yet for people to see, but keep a close eye out. starting with "the impossible." this is a movie starring naomi watts and ewan mcgregor. a family, a true story. they went to thailand two days before the tsunami, and the movie is aptly titled because it's impossible not to lose your mind crying during it. the filmm
the best translators in this country. it will be like east germany because people will be afraid to be themselves that's why we have the fourth amendment. >> steve: i wonder how many terrorists activities or plots have been stopped by this program. >> you know, a good question. we probably will never know. >> steve: because it's a question -- which is the greater risk? that we listen in on some international phone calls or another 9-11? >> that's a very good question ask judgment that the congress is not permit to do make because the fourth amendment -- >> steve: that is what they're too long. >> ha is what they're doing. when the congress changes the constitution, it is acting unconstitutionally. only the states. you just talked about amending the constitution. only the states can change the constitution. so the fourth amendment says you want to snoop? get a search warrant. judges available 24/7. >> gretchen: read your column on foxnews.com and i hope i see you on studio b. i'll be hosting for sheppard. >> what a lively day this will be. >> merry christmas. >> steve: make up you
've heard from germany and also the netherlands agreeing to send some patriot missile batteries there as well along with troops as well. you're looking about 1200 troops between the three countries. you want to contain it. so far you've been pretty good keeping it within the borders of syria. if it spills over you're looking at area already racked by war for two years. what can happen then? they want to make sure that doesn't. we'll watch that. alisyn: next three weeks obviously will be critical. we're just getting started here. we have a heartbreaking story of heroism linked to the horrible oregon mall shooting. we'll talk about a man who put his own life to try to save another. bill: a former u.s. marine locked up in mexico on what his family call as trumped up charge. the desperate plea for the government's help and serious concerns now that his life is in danger. >> i asked you to continue to pray for him. we got a call from him last night. he's just in a really tough situation because it's public in mexico at this point. so we are praying that you will pray for his protecti
in the u.s., real estate in hong kong, and the optics industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >> brian: an after math of an over night bomb in kabul, stan stan. a u.s. militarior - military contractor. carolina panth thers - panthers celebrates and all of the sudden the guard rail collapses . no word yet on if anybody was hurt. gretch. >> gretchen:, brian. house speaker john boehner removing a stumbling block. raising tax rate for those making a million or more? could this seal a deal with the white house. hold your horses. this is far from a done deal. >> this is a very important shift. speaker boehner is retreating on an issue principle and said you can raise tax rates on wealthy people . previously he said we'll get more money out of limiting deductions. it is an
aircraft. but this move part of a nato response. also supplied by germany and holland whose parliament last week approved their contributions. the u.s., though, of course, putting a number of people on the ground. many observers saying that now nato has physical troops and presence in the area that it risks somehow being dragged into this particular conflict. everybody is stressing these are purely there to defend turkey, a staunch nato member. john? >> they still come as the u.s. offered diplomatic recognition to the rebels in syria and with 400 u.s. troops there, it does give the u.s. some skin in this game. >> reporter: absolutely. i don't think the troops will be involved. skin in the game, certainly. the obama administration though many say caught between two different sides here. at the same time, the day before they gave some kind of lower level diplomatic recognition to the syrian government. the day before that they were a terror group, one of the more hard line parts of the rebel front responsible for many victories, considered islamic hard-liners. to many degrees they're heroes b
things are made in germany. probably made in the u.s. china has been a major gap in this whole system. on sanctions and north korea could face tougher action from china might constrict some of its ability to buy things that it absolutely needs for its nuclear programs. jon: you think it is likely american-made technology is helping north korea with its missile program? >> could be. i don't know the missile program nearly as well as the nuclear but what north korea does, it uses china a sense as a transshipment point because many companies, high-tech companies from america, from europe, have subsidiaries in china, selling to chinese industries and trading companies. north korea works that system very well to end up with those kinds of high-tech items from outside china. and so while i can't speak specifically on the missile program i certainly can on the nuclear and yes, indeed, north korea buys european high-tech equipment and likely u.s. equipment. so it's a problem. china has been made aware of the problem but they haven't done enough and, i think this missile launch could be a furt
. these countries no longer have much in common with one another. >> more about life in soviet east germany from the end of world war ii through 1956 from her historical narrative, sunday night at 8:00 on c-span. >> "washington journal" continues. host: we want to welcome sarah kliff, a health care reporter with "the washington post." as we continue our series, we want to take a look at different aspects of what we can expect as we face the january 1 deadline. we want to talk about the said likely the doc fix. many people say you have to understand the doc fix. guest: it is something we have had since about a decade ago. back in 1997, congress set a formula for how to pay doc fares. it worked for about five years until the cost of health care started growing. what we have seen every year is congress passed a temporary pay patch to make up the difference. every year, we get to the end of the year and there is this in. gap. right now if we do not pass it, medicare salaries will go down by 25%. everyone thinks the doc fix is not a good idea and we should fix it permanently. it is something that we
the next few weeks into early next year. we know that germany and net they are netherlands are onset to deploy their troops as well. this is an incredible volatile area. remember, this all started because two months ago there were exchanges of fire between the turkish and syrian fire often by syrian military. they asked for help from nato and now they got what they asked for. we're hearing from secretary of defense leon panetta that there is a plan for the youu.s. to ge involved if chemical weapons are used. it's not clear if the patriots will be involved in that. they are designed to take out missiles. we're seeing an he escalation n and contributing military means to the area. certainly tensions are even higher on that border. don? >> nick paton walsh, thank you. >>> president barack obama speaking out about recreational marijuana use. in an interview with barbara walters, the president said the u.s. government has, quote, bigger fish to fry than going after users. >> you know, the federal government has a lot to do when it comes to criminal prosecutions. it does not make sense fro
pulled out of a deal with germany. you know what, this kind of well, it doesn't sit too well are allege laters -- regulators who have to approve it. the exchanges they are in favor of combining. the companies announced today that the value $8.2 in stock. and to give you some perspective on that, that's a premium of 33% over wednesday's closing price in new york. tori? >> what does this mean for the average investor and will the new york stock exchange still operate in new york? >> reporter: well, you know what, this most likely means not a lot for the average investor. you know what? you'll still buy and sell your stock through brokers and you won't notice a change here. this is much bigger news for insiders and word of the new york stock exchange seems to be staying there. >> thank you. >>> 7:11. new details this morning about the mother of the gunman in the quit school shooting. the -- in the connecticut school shooting and the tremendous support for the victims and the community of newtown. >>> edging closer to the fiscal cliff, the vote happening today and the expected result. >>> g
-800-345-2550 after that, it's on to germany. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 then tonight, i'm trading 9500 miles away in japan. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 with the new global account from schwab, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i hunt down opportunities around the world tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 as if i'm right there. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i'm in total control because i can trade tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 directly online in 12 markets in their local currencies. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i use their global research to get an edge. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 their equity ratings show me how schwab tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 rates specific foreign stocks tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 based on things like fundamentals, momentum and risk. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i also have access to independent tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 firms like ned davis research tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and economist intelligence unit. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 plus, i can talk to their global specialists 24/7. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and trade in my global account commission-free tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 through march 2013. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 best part... no jet lag. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 call 1-866-294-5409
one. >> angela merkel number two. easy to understand. >> europe goes through germany and germany goes through merkel. >> let's talk about vladimir putin coming in at number three. >> yes. he has been on the list even when he wasn't president because we all know who was still running the show then. he's back up there with a bullet. he's been as high as two on this list. here is somebody who has a u.n. security council permanency, controls a huge oil and gas reserve, has a nuclear tipped army and wields his power very effectively. >> and loves to show his muscles. many times as possible. >> powerful in many ways. that's right. >> of late bill gates has been the rodney dangerfield of silicon valley or seattle. he gets absolutely no respect but you give him plenty. he comes in at number four. why? >> this is where you talk about the spheres of power. here's somebody who is trying to cure world disease. in favourable terms of affecting millions of lives. he is 57 years old. he's the second richest man in the world. he has the most influential nonprofit in the world. and if you just look at
voted for rug declaring war on japan and germany. back to present-day politics, we now know that the u.s. supreme court plans to dive into one of the most talked about and emotional issues of our age. whether same-sex couples have the right to marry. the high court is taking on two cases, one involving the federal defense of marriage act, or d doma, and another involving california's proposition 8, banning same-sex marriages in that state. for analysis into these historic cases, what's going to be a historic hearing, i want to bring in kinji yoshityoshito, professor of constitutional law at new york city. great to see you. >> good to see you. >> put prop 8 aside for a second. do you believe that the supreme court will strike down doma. this is what what you've said. walk me through your thinking on that one. >> y bet. so doma is a really narrow challenge insofar as what the statute does is it says for federal purposes marriages are defined between one man and one woman. so i think it might be best to clarify this by example. so you take edie windsor, a plaintiff coming out of new york
gross domestic product on healthcare. the next highest was france and germany. united king come 9.6. and germany and france on many measures are getting better healthcare out comes than we are. and we know if you fast forward to 2012 we're not spending that, we're over 18%. 1 in every 6 dollars in this economy is going to healthcare. and however much one saves on healthcare, 40% of that flows through to the federal government because the federal government is paying 40% of healthcare in this country, actually something more than that. there is lots of room to save money in this healthcare system and there by save money in medicare and medicaid. we're talking about a very small percentage about what we intend to spend over the next ten years in the savings that are being discussed. the same is true on discretionary savings. the president called for $200 billion. discretionary savings on top of the billion that has been done. but if we put it in perspective we're going to spend in the domestic accounts in the next ten years $11.6 trillion. so a $200 billion savings is 1.7% of what w
in germany had trained dogs on the street. there were no robberies or assaults because people know that the dog would get them. the security is not working. children and adults need to be protected. it would be safer to have trained dogs in every school and the malls and big theater complexes. host: we got your points. john fund. guest: i am not sure it would be less expensive to have a handle and a dog. i grew up much of my life in europe. i understand they have strict gun control laws there. the top three in terms of fatalities until friday were in britain and germany. those were often used with assault weapons. people can get access to these weapons. if you are a criminal or criminally insane, you do not care about the law. host: this comes from twitter. there were some graphics this morning from "the washington post." the ban on assault weapons includes massachusetts, maryland, new york, and hawaii. 30 states require -- every port of the mental health of buyers -- require a report of the mental health of buyers. what do you make of the mental health requirements and awaiting pe
.s. soldier who was stationed in germany. he had a little girl with a scottish citizen. while he was deployed to afghanistan, the mother brought the little girl up to scotland where she's from, as a lot of military families do. after his deployment was finished, he then moved to alabama, was stationed a the a base there and that's when the marriage fell apart. >> steve: expecting her to come live with him? >> the mother did come live with him as did the daughter, but the marriage fell apart. so the mom grabbed the little girl and headed back to scotland. that's when the u.s. courts really got involved. there was a lower u.s. court that ruled -- i think is what will surprise some folks -- that there is a treaty that the u.s. and the u.k. are a party to, along with a lot of other parties, call the international child abduction treaty. and that treaty is what was upheld by the lower courts in the united states. so the mother was able to keep custody of the little girl. now the u.s. supreme court is hearing the case today and we'll see what happens. the effects of this, the impact of this will li
, particularly in germany has been very successful in training their workforce. we'd like to push into areas that are really going into training, health care and health care i.t. it's an area which is growing in terms of job growth that has very low formalized training that can bring in a people into the workforce. and we are calling for a million apprenticeships next year. so that is the kind trying to find ways to manage directly what employers are looking for with the skill training set. >> that's great. thank you so much everyone. i think thanks to the panel. i think jocelyn will come up and give us a few more closing remarks. >> i everybody. that will be concluding our discussion this morning. wanted to thank you all for attending and for asking such great questions and voting in our poll. and also to our panelists, who have done a great job, having a dialogue here with us in engaging us in some really important issues facing our country. so thank you all again, and hope to see you at the next heartland monitor poll release. have a good day, thank you. [applause] >> [inaudible conversat
of the will. major nato players such as germany did not play. what really turned out to be the case is absent the united states were anything but a very small, almost counterinsurgency operations in places like sierra leone ore and liberia, nato cannot really deploy and operate. it does not have the capabilities. it does not have the specialized systems like air refueling tankers and all that. the u.s. at to provide most of the curls -- cruise missiles and after a few is most of the air to ground bonds. and so even if you were to say that we're going to renegotiate the treaty to it's going to be a decade, probably to before nato countries absent the u.s. at the capabilities to really control things along the mediterranean. nothing earlier. >> host: let me give you a twitter. deadlines are often a factor in going over budget and-unforeseen consequences. >> there are all kinds of negative unforeseen consequences. the trouble is in the original pricing the unforeseen is not foreseen. because what we have none of the past seven, eight years is the program is over budget. rare exceptions. every pr
, people look at a 60-year-old green turtle as it crawls toward the ocean. in germany, an eiffel tower replica in the center of a shopping ball is erected and a group of choir boys hit the ice on the coldest day of the year and in ukraine, a dusting of snow covers lennon, the revolutionary figure. pictures from around the world. >>> six weeks after superstorm sandy made landfall victims in places like staten island are dealing with toxic homes. experts say mold may be the top health threat facing those that are trying to rebuild. our national correspondent deborah feyerick is joining us from new york with more information. what's going on here, deb? >> you know, wolf, a number of people who have already started complaining about breathing problems and the problem is likely to only get worse. every day nancy suits up for a battle she's determined to win. >> i give myself four hours. you do both sides and the top. >> reporter: bleach, hydrogen peroxi peroxide, vinegar, even professionals have not been able to kill the flood in the wake of sandy's floodwaters. >> i'm trying to stay ahead
since world war ii? i mean, i don't think germany's going to invade france any time soon or russia's going to invade poland. but yet we have a huge amount of deployed american forces in europe. i mean, maybe we need to have a discussion about whether or not we need that. whether or not we can afford that expense. whether or not that does anything to enhance our security. again, i want a military that is the best in the world, i want it to continue to be that way, i want it to be second to none. i want to make sure we have all that we need but i don't want to be investing in things we don't need. and when the joint chiefs of staff and when the secretary of defense and all the experts tell us that they don't need something and we here appropriate money to keep something going that is unnecessary, that is unwanted, at the same time while you're trying to cut the benefits of some poor old lady, her social security, there's something wrong with this equation. we got to start thinking about the security of people here in this country as well. and what we're going to do right after this i
behaved heroically during that period. then they were evacuated to germany. >> when do we evacuate our people in tripoli? >> it was within a few hours. >> the time let's really get confused here. i think people we to your chameleons land. there's a great deal of time that evolved in between. i'm not blaming you to because you two really shouldn't be here today. secretary of state should be here today. she can't be here. i understand she's injured and i respect that. but there's something wrong here. the american people should wonder what happened that night and why it took so long. before that, why would we pull the best trained people we have out of an area that is called -- it was a dangerous spot, a high risk, high threat and we made it a soft target. we actually emboldened those folks there that night to say, guys. you know who we replaced the team with? libyan nationals at $4 an hour unarmed. and that's the way we respond to high risk areas. that's how we respond to areas that are volatile? that's how we respond to areas in the response possible? the same time we were doing this,
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 61 (some duplicates have been removed)